New Journal “Culture and Brain” – Open for Submissions

7 09 2012

The first journal dedicated exclusively to cultural neuroscience has been launched and is now ready to receive manuscripts! The journal is titled “Culture and Brain“, published by Springer and edited by Prof. Shihui Han of the CSCN Lab in Peking. For the submission system, link here.

The journal “covers the mutual interaction between culture and human cognition and behavior”, “explores the influence of brain/sociocultural interaction on cognitive function and neural mechanisms” and “includes an expansive range of disciplines, from neuroscience to biology to anthropology and philosophy”.

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5th FPR-UCLA Interdisciplinary Conference: Culture, Mind, and Brain: Emerging Concepts, Methods, Applications – 19–20 October 2012 / Los Angeles, California

8 05 2012

5th FPR-UCLA Interdisciplinary Conference: Culture, Mind, and Brain: Emerging Concepts, Methods, Applications will be held at UCLA,  Los Angeles, California from 19–20 October 2012.

Description

“Many lines of research on culture, mind, and brain can no longer be neatly separated. Some questions run together, thanks to our growing understanding of the genome, the biological roots of human sociality, and the mutual constitution of cultures and selves, as well as the complex interactions between the physical, cultural, and social environments underlying health and illness.

The aim of this 2-day conference is to highlight emerging concepts, methodologies and applications in the study of culture, mind, and brain, with particular attention to:

  1. cutting-edge neuroscience research that is successfully incorporating culture and the social world;
  2. the context in which methods are used as well as the tacit assumptions that shape research questions; and
  3. the kinds and quality of collaborations that can advance interdisciplinary research training.

The conference is designed to appeal to a wide academic audience of biologists, neuroscientists, psychologists, anthropologists, sociologists, epidemiologists, and those in related fields interested in learning about cutting-edge interdisciplinary research at the intersection of culture, mind, and brain.”

What I really love about this conference and what makes it even more promising is its actual focus on interdisciplinarity. The impressive speaker list includes Shinobu Kitayama, Shihui Han, Denise Park, Marco Iacoboni, Daniel Lende & Greg Downey (of the Neuroanthropology blog), Georg Northoff, Laurence J. Kirmayer and many more.

Registration

Early registration ends on August 20, 2012. Late registration from August 21, 2012 to September 20, 2012. There is no opportunity for poster presentations, but students may apply for limited conference scholarships to be refunded. For more information and registration link here. Please note that seating is very limited. Please note that the FPR conference in 2010 sold out two months before the end of early registration.





Symposium on Empathy: Self, Society, Culture – November 2011

10 02 2011

 

 

 

 

Indiana University organizes a symposium titled “Empathy: Self, Society, Culture” on November 11-12, 2011.

Growing out of a two-year grant-supported project on “Virtuous Empathy: Scientific and Humanistic Investigations” this symposium aims to explore theories and practices of empathy. Papers are invited to explore both virtuous and vicious forms of empathy, and to do so from a variety of perspectives. Proposals for papers are invited in three broad categories: Empathy and Psychology; Empathy and Ethics; and Empathy in Culture, History, and Society. Read the rest of this entry »





The What, Why and How of Cultural Neuroscience – Part 1: What is Cultural Neuroscience?

28 01 2011

What is Cultural Neuroscience?

The term “cultural neuroscience” was coined by Joan Chiao, a former graduate student of Nalini Ambady at Harvard University. It describes an emerging interdisciplinary field focused on investigating the multidirectional interactions between culture, mind, genes and the brain (Chiao & Ambady, 2007 in the Handbook of Cultural Psychology, edited by Kitayama and Cohen). The relationship is not assumed to be unidirectional because cultural practices adapt to neurobiological constraints on the one hand and human neurobiology adapts to cultural experience on the other (Ambady & Bharucha, 2009). Read the rest of this entry »